Portfolio Requirements

Portfolio Requirements

You are working toward an important milestone in your career as a professional.  The completion of your degree requires the submission of a professional portfolio.  The portfolio includes many elements related to your current or future job search and also represents some of your important accomplishments throughout your program.
Every program’s portfolio consists of the following elements:

  • Part A: Career Preparation Documents
  • Part B: Two Writing Samples
  • Part C: Concentration Application
  • Part D: The Practicum/Internship Experience

Please note that portfolio elements do differ based upon the program and concentration; therefore, be sure to follow your program’s specific requirements.
Portfolios are prepared in your Practicum or Internship experience course.  Consult your specific program/concentration for the course.

TESOL Portfolio Requirements

Portfolio Description
Each candidate for graduation from the MA TESOL program is required to submit a Summative Concentration Portfolio containing the following elements:

Cover Page and Table of Contents
Part A: Career Preparation Documents

  • Resume—A resume showcasing your education credentials, teaching experience, skills and accomplishments, and other relevant work experience
  • List of Professional References—This should include the names, professional titles, mailing address, phone numbers, and email addresses for at least 5 professional references. (You may not include family members.)
  • Teaching Philosophy Statement—In addition to describing your philosophy of teaching, this statement of 500-1000 words should illustrate how you put your values and ideas into practice, demonstrate your professional expertise with references to the state of the art in language education, and exhibit motivation for lifelong learning and continued professional development.

Professional Development Plan—This document, which can be a revised version of your Practicum Learning Agreement, should include information on your current and future plans as a professional and focus on areas for growth over your program and beyond.

Part B: Two Writing Samples

  • Review of Published Language Learning Materials—A constructively review of language learning/teaching materials (for example, a textbook, software, or website). Following a clear description of the content and types of activities in the materials, as well as a judgment of the types of learners and learning contexts the materials would be appropriate for, there should be a thematically organized evaluative component which refers to theory, research, and practice, with critical reflection and insightful commentary.
  • Research Synthesis—A sample manuscript that provides a research synthesis (such as a literature review, final research paper, or action research report) of at least 7 pages in length.

Part C: Concentration Applications 

  • Design Rationale—This should explain the reasons behind decisions that you made in designing your lesson plans, materials, and assessments. It should include a description of contextual factors and learner factors, an explicit statement of learning objectives, thematically organized explanations of the pedagogical rationales underlying selected aspects (e.g., what learning processes or outcomes you intended to be facilitated by an activity, how, and why), multiple references to authoritative sources, and a list of references in APA format, citing any sources that you used.
  • Lesson Plans and Self-Designed Materials—A series of lesson plans for (at least) 300 minutes of instruction, accompanied by all of the materials and instructions that you would use in the classes, in exactly the form they would be provided to students (e.g., handouts, PowerPoint presentations).
  • Assessment Instruments—These should include at least one example of a formative assessment that you have created and could implement in your specific content area and at least one example of a summative or performance assessment that you have created and could implement in your specific content area. At least one form of assessment should include a grading rubric, answer key, or other scoring scheme.

Part D: The Practicum Experience

  • Practicum Reflections—A compiled journal of 10 papers reflecting on the classroom observation, collaborative lesson planning, and supervised teaching experiences you had during the Practicum.
  • Teaching Demonstration Video—A 45-minute language teaching demonstration showcasing your ability to set clear objectives and integrate multiple skills in student-centered activities involving meaningful practice and applications of knowledge.
  • Practicum Timesheets—Signed copies of all 15 weekly timesheets submitted as part of the TESOL Practicum.

Optional Additional Materials

  • Student Testimonials and/or Supervisor Evaluations
  • Other Evidence of Professional Development (e.g., certificates of participation in workshops, conferences, speaker series; evidence of volunteering)
  • Other Demonstrations of Professional Expertise (e.g., needs assessment plan, classroom management plan, language program evaluation)

Graduate Certificate in TESOL Portfolio Requirements

Portfolio Description
Each candidate for graduation from the Graduate Certificate in TESOL program is required to submit a Summative Concentration Portfolio containing the following elements:

Cover Page and Table of Contents
Part A: Career Preparation Documents

  • Resume—A resume showcasing your education credentials, teaching experience, skills and accomplishments, and other relevant work experience
  • List of Professional References—This should include the names, professional titles, mailing address, phone numbers, and email addresses for at least 5 professional references. (You may not include family members.)
  • Teaching Philosophy Statement—In addition to describing your philosophy of teaching, this statement of 500-1000 words should illustrate how you put your values and ideas into practice, demonstrate your professional expertise with references to the state of the art in language education, and exhibit motivation for lifelong learning and continued professional development.
  • Professional Development Plan—This document, which can be a revised version of your Practicum Learning Agreement, should include information on your current and future plans as a professional and focus on areas for growth over your program and beyond.

Part B: Two Writing Samples

  • Review of Published Language Learning Materials—A constructively review of language learning/teaching materials (for example, a textbook, software, or website). Following a clear description of the content and types of activities in the materials, as well as a judgment of the types of learners and learning contexts the materials would be appropriate for, there should be a thematically organized evaluative component which refers to theory, research, and practice, with critical reflection and insightful commentary.
  • Research Synthesis—A sample manuscript that provides a research synthesis (such as a literature review, final research paper, or action research report) of at least 7 pages in length.

Part C: Concentration Applications

  • Design Rationale—This should explain the reasons behind decisions that you made in designing your lesson plans, materials, and assessments. It should include a description of contextual factors and learner factors, an explicit statement of learning objectives, thematically organized explanations of the pedagogical rationales underlying selected aspects (e.g., what learning processes or outcomes you intended to be facilitated by an activity, how, and why), multiple references to authoritative sources, and a list of references in APA format, citing any sources that you used.
  • Lesson Plans and Self-Designed Materials—A series of lesson plans for (at least) 300 minutes of instruction, accompanied by all of the materials and instructions that you would use in the classes, in exactly the form they would be provided to students (e.g., handouts, PowerPoint presentations).
  • Assessment Instruments—These should include at least one example of a formative assessment that you have created and could implement in your specific content area and at least one example of a summative or performance assessment that you have created and could implement in your specific content area. At least one form of assessment should include a grading rubric, answer key, or other scoring scheme.

Part D: The Practicum Experience

  • Practicum Reflections—A compiled journal of 10 papers reflecting on the classroom observation, collaborative lesson planning, and supervised teaching experiences you had during the Practicum.
  • Teaching Demonstration Video—A 45-minute language teaching demonstration showcasing your ability to set clear objectives and integrate multiple skills in student-centered activities involving meaningful practice and applications of knowledge.
  • Practicum Timesheets—Signed copies of all 15 weekly timesheets submitted as part of the TESOL Practicum.
    Optional Additional Materials

  • Student Testimonials and/or Supervisor Evaluations
  • Other Evidence of Professional Development (e.g., certificates of participation in workshops, conferences, speaker series; evidence of volunteering)
  • Other Demonstrations of Professional Expertise (e.g., needs assessment plan, classroom management plan, language program evaluation)

MS in Applied Linguistics Portfolio Requirements

Please note that each concentration in the MS in Applied Linguistics program has slightly different requirements for the concentration application; therefore, please consult the specific concentration for the requirements.
Portfolio Description
Each candidate for graduation from the MS in Applied Linguistics program is required to submit a Summative Concentration Portfolio containing the following elements:

Multilingual Education Portfolio

Cover Page and Table of Contents

Part A: Career Preparation Documents

  • Resume—A resume showcasing your education credentials, teaching experience, skills and accomplishments, and other relevant work experience
  • List of Professional References—This should include the names, professional titles, mailing address, phone numbers, and email addresses for at least 5 professional references. (You may not include family members.)
  • Professional Philosophy Statement—In addition to describing your philosophy of teaching, this statement of 500-1000 words should illustrate how you put your values and ideas into practice, demonstrate your professional expertise with references to the state of the art in multilingual education, and exhibit motivation for lifelong learning and continued professional development.
  • Professional Development Plan—This document, which can be a revised and expanded version of your Internship Learning Agreement, should include information on your current and future plans as a professional and focus on areas for growth over your program and beyond.

Part B: Two Writing Samples

  • Research Synthesis—A sample manuscript that provides a research synthesis (such as a literature review or final research paper) of at least 7 pages in length.
  • Analysis—A sample manuscript that demonstrates your critical thinking and analysis skills, such as a review of language learning/teaching materials or a critique of an empirical research article.

Part C: Concentration Applications

  • Design Rationale—This should explain the reasons behind decisions that you made in designing your lesson plans, materials, and assessments. It should include a description of contextual factors and learner factors, an explicit statement of learning objectives, thematically organized explanations of the pedagogical rationales underlying selected aspects (e.g., what learning processes or outcomes you intended to be facilitated by an activity, how, and why), multiple references to authoritative sources, and a list of references in APA format, citing any sources that you used.
  • Lesson Plans and Self-Designed Materials—A series of lesson plans for (at least) 300 minutes of instruction, accompanied by all of the materials and instructions that you would use in the classes, in exactly the form they would be provided to students (e.g., handouts, PowerPoint presentations).
  • Assessment Instruments—These should include at least one example of a formative assessment that you have created and could implement in your specific content area and at least one example of a summative or performance assessment that you have created and could implement in your specific content area. At least one form of assessment should include a grading rubric, answer key, or other scoring scheme.

Part D: The Internship Experience

  • Learning Outcome Tracking Log—A finalized version of the learning outcome tracking log that you maintained and discussed with your internship advisor throughout the Internship in Multilingual Education.
  • Internship Reflections—A compiled journal of 5 papers reflecting on your internship experiences.
  • Culminating Artifact—A final product that represents the culmination of your internship experience (e.g., classroom management plan, systematic evaluation of your lesson plans and materials, empirical action research report).
  • Internship Timesheets—Signed copies of all 15 weekly timesheets submitted as part of the Internship in Multilingual Education.

Optional Additional Materials

  • Student Testimonials and/or Supervisor Evaluations
  • Other Evidence of Professional Development (e.g., certificates of participation in workshops, conferences, speaker series; evidence of volunteering)
  • Other Demonstrations of Professional Expertise (e.g., teaching demonstration video, needs assessment plan, language program evaluation)

Program Management Portfolio

Cover Page and Table of Contents
Part A: Career Preparation Documents

  • Resume—A resume showcasing your education credentials, administrative experience, skills and accomplishments, and other relevant work experience
  • List of Professional References—This should include the names, professional titles, mailing address, phone numbers, and email addresses for at least 5 professional references. (You may not include family members.)
  • Professional Philosophy Statement—In addition to describing your administrative philosophy, this statement of 500-1000 words should illustrate how you put your values and ideas into practice, demonstrate your professional expertise with references to the state of the art, and exhibit motivation for lifelong learning and continued professional development.
  • Professional Development Plan—This document, which can be a revised and expanded version of your Internship Learning Agreement, should include information on your current and future plans as a professional and focus on areas for growth over your program and beyond.

Part B: Two Writing Samples

  • Research Synthesis—A sample manuscript that provides a research synthesis (such as a literature review or final research paper) of at least 7 pages in length.
  • Analysis—A sample manuscript that demonstrates your critical thinking and analysis skills, such as a review of language learning/teaching materials or a critique of an empirical research article.

Part C: Concentration Applications

  • Needs Assessment Plan and Instruments—In addition to the needs assessment materials themselves, this should include a document outlining the key stakeholders; a brief history of the organization and its current mission; desired inputs/outputs and expected/desired results; interview or focus group questions (addressing the needs of all key stakeholders including at least teachers, students, and administrators); the program artifacts/resources/data that would be needed to assess the needs of the program; an implementation plan including data collection procedures and strategies for maintaining ethical conduct throughout the process; and an overview of any internal or external governing body requirements (e.g., accreditation commissions, departments of education, school-specific requirements, etc.).
  • Program Evaluation—After implementing the needs assessment plan, provide a narrative of how the evaluation process unfolded, a summary of the findings (including any existing gaps, strengths, and/or weaknesses), suggestions for improvement, recommendations for how the suggestions could be implemented, and remaining areas to be explored. The evaluation should be approached as if it were a proposal to a school or program administrator, and your recommendations should be based upon your research and interactions with key stakeholders.

Part D: The Internship Experience

  • Learning Outcome Tracking Log—A finalized version of the learning outcome tracking log that you maintained and discussed with your internship advisor throughout the Internship in Program Management.
  • Internship Reflections—A compiled journal of 5 papers reflecting on your internship experiences.
  • Culminating Artifact—A final product that represents the culmination of your internship experience (decided upon with your internship course advisor).
  • Internship Timesheets—Signed copies of all 15 weekly timesheets submitted as part of the Internship in Program Management.

Optional Additional Materials

  • Student Testimonials and/or Supervisor Evaluations
  • Other Evidence of Professional Development (e.g., certificates of participation in workshops, conferences, speaker series; evidence of volunteering)
  • Other Demonstrations of Professional Expertise (e.g., design rationale for lesson plans, materials, and/or assessments; classroom management plan; teaching demonstration video)

Educational Technology Portfolio

Cover Page and Table of Contents
Part A: Career Preparation Documents

  • Resume—A resume showcasing your education credentials, administrative experience, skills and accomplishments, and other relevant work experience
  • List of Professional References—This should include the names, professional titles, mailing address, phone numbers, and email addresses for at least 5 professional references. (You may not include family members.)
  • Professional Philosophy Statement—In addition to describing your teaching and/or administrative philosophy, this statement of 500-1000 words should illustrate how you put your values and ideas into practice, demonstrate your professional expertise with references to the state of the art, and exhibit motivation for lifelong learning and continued professional development.
  • Professional Development Plan—This document, which can be a revised and expanded version of your Internship Learning Agreement, should include information on your current and future plans as a professional and focus on areas for growth over your program and beyond.

Part B: Two Writing Samples

  • Research Synthesis—A sample manuscript that provides a research synthesis (such as a literature review or final research paper) of at least 7 pages in length.
  • Analysis—A sample manuscript that demonstrates your critical thinking and analysis skills, such as a review of language learning/teaching materials or a critique of an empirical research article.

Part C: Concentration Applications

  • Needs Assessment—This should include an assessment of the needs of a specific set of students for an existing program, including a detailed description of the context and participants, the needs assessment instruments employed, an evaluation of the needs of the students (including their current level of knowledge/skills, previous experiences, etc.), and suggestions for how the school could address the needs of this student population. This should be done in consultation with the school administration, teachers, and a sample of current students through interviews and syntheses of information provided by these key stakeholders.
  • Online Course Design—Create a plan for how a fully online course would address the areas identified in the needs assessment. The plan should include weekly learning objectives, the specific content to be covered, a syllabus, the textbooks and other resources that would be used, a completed course development planner, and a sample of videos, resources, and assessments for use in the class. This plan should be approached as if it were a proposal to a school or program administrator.
  • Strategic Implementation or Improvement Plan—This plan should be a summary of how you would tie your needs assessment to the online course that you developed or to the evaluation of an existing course. A clear framework for incorporation of the needs of the stakeholders and the design of the course should be evident.

Part D: The Internship Experience

  • Learning Outcome Tracking Log—A finalized version of the learning outcome tracking log that you maintained and discussed with your internship advisor throughout the Internship in Program Management.
  • Internship Reflections—A compiled journal of 5 papers reflecting on your internship experiences.
  • Culminating Artifact—A final product that represents the culmination of your internship experience (decided upon with your internship course advisor).
  • Internship Timesheets—Signed copies of all 15 weekly timesheets submitted as part of the Internship in Educational Technology.

Optional Additional Materials

  • Student Testimonials and/or Supervisor Evaluations
  • Other Evidence of Professional Development (e.g., certificates of participation in workshops, conferences, speaker series; evidence of volunteering)
  • Other Demonstrations of Professional Expertise (e.g., design rationale for lesson plans, materials, and/or assessments; classroom management plan; teaching demonstration video; language program evaluation)
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